Staff reflections: Michele Pulver

biopicIn this series, “Staff Reflections,” we introduce the members of the Innovations for Learning team, who will tell us what brought them to our organization and why they’re excited to do this work. 
Today: Michele Pulver, National Director for Teacher Services

I am a speech-language pathologist by training and began my career working in schools and in private practice. I see fascinating connections between learning language and learning to read, and believe technology can be useful in both.

I left the classroom to shift my focus toward teacher training and professional development. For 10 years I worked with the reading-instruction program Earobics and its parent company Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, eventually managing the professional-development team for technology-focused programs for the north half of the USA.

I joined Innovations for Learning in 2010, and now I oversee the teacher training and coaching around  TeacherMate and TutorMate programs. I work directly with teachers — and also manage our Teacher Ambassadors, IFL’s own little literacy army. These knowledgeable folks work one-on-one with teachers to help them get the most out of IFL’s programs. I’m so grateful for them!

I couldn’t ask for a better job. I get a front-row view of the nearly miraculous changes and growth that happen in these critical early school years.

Kids in K and 1 are still learning the “rules” of school. They are still figuring out how to “be” and how to sit still and how to focus their attention on a task for longer periods of time. Teachers are artful shepherds, gradually shaping behaviors and teaching new skills that help students gain independence. K and 1 teachers set in place the building blocks of life-long learning.

The days in K and 1 are often filled with the mundane: tying shoes, wiping noses, celebrating successes (“You did it! I knew you could and you tried and you did it!”) and correcting off-task behaviors (“I think your voice should be at a level 0. Please use your words”).

They are filled with modeling, guided practice and establishing (and reestablishing) routines (“Let’s talk about how we line up…”).

Most importantly, they are filled with wonder.

Wonder is a powerful thing. When children begin to wonder, they are taking the first step toward visualizing texts and imagining outcomes. When a teacher wonders how to improve a lesson or how to reach a child, she is taking the first step towards self-improvement.

And it IS wonderful….

It is wonderful to see a student’s eyes light up when they’ve read a whole page (or a whole book!) for the first time. It is wonderful to see little brows furrowed in deep concentration as they coax their eyes and brains to try something new.

It is wonderful to hear kids say, “I need to read now. Please be quiet.”

It is wonderful to enjoy the non-sequiter observations a child can make. Recently, a first-grader raised his hand while I was discussing the riveting concept of initial consonant blends, and — completely disconnected from the subject — told me that “Praying Mantises don’t really pray.” Wonderful.

Take a little time to enjoy the wonder that our world and our classrooms provide.

Wonderful.

Michele Pulver
michele@innovationsforlearning.org
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Posted on January 31, 2013, in IFL, Innovation, Reading, Staff Reflections, TeacherMate, Teaching, TutorMate, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. I wish I could have had Michele as my teacher. She is truly wonderful.

  2. Wonderful words from Michele!! She helps our school with TeacherMate and tutoring and does such a great and caring job. Our school is grateful for it’s partnership with IFL. 😀

  1. Pingback: Staff reflections: Sybil Anderson | Innovations for Learning

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