Tim Daly, developer of new teachers, joins IFL board

daly_TD (1)Timothy Daly, president of TNTP, a nonprofit that’s taking the lead in recruiting and training new teachers for poor and minority students, has joined the Innovations for Learning board of directors.

“We are thrilled to have Tim join the board of directors,” said Seth Weinberger, IFL’s founder and executive director. “He is one of the keenest strategic thinkers in education, and his experience in growing an education organization is invaluable to us at our stage of growth. ”

The New York-based TNTP believes that “nothing our schools can do to give every child a great education matters more than giving them great teachers.

“Ending educational inequality starts with providing excellent teachers to the students who need them most.”

According to the organization’s website,

[Daly] played a key role in the publication of The Widget Effect (2009), an acclaimed study detailing the flaws in teacher evaluation. The report informed the federal government’s $4.3 billion Race to the Top initiative and helped catalyze legislation in more than 15 states.  More recently, he participated in the writing of The Irreplaceables(2012), which explored the teacher retention crisis through the experience of the country’s best teachers.

Daly came to TNTP in 2001 after serving as a Teach For America corps member at Baltimore middle school. He began with the New York City Teaching Fellows, a program that recruits and prepares highly qualified people to become teachers in the nation’s largest school district. Nearly 10,000 NYC Teaching Fellows now work in city classrooms, accounting for one in five science teachers, and one in four math and special-education teachers, the organization says.

In 2012, Daly and TNTP CEO Ariela Rozman were co-recipients of the Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Prize in Education.

He holds a MA in Teaching from Johns Hopkins University and a BA in American Studies from Northwestern University.

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Posted on December 7, 2012, in IFL, Innovation, Philanthropy, Teaching and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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